4-H Intern, Round Two

17 hours and I’ll be on the road to my last year of college. May 13, 2017, I’ll be a WTAMU Alumni! Graduating college in three and half years is a pretty impressive feat for someone who was told she has a tumor the size of a plum on her brainstem days before moving to college.

(Here’s that story. Nice to reread older posts and see how my writing has improved over the years. Presently the tumor continues to shrink, I wear glasses, and sway when I walked completely sober.)

This summer I was the Montrose County 4-H intern again. It advised that going back to an internship where I would not have a potential job waiting for me when I graduate wasn’t the smartest career move. However, truly enjoying the people I worked with and knowing I was impacting younger generations (even have two high school seniors looking at West Texas A&M, go Buffs!) was worth it.

Already knowing what was expected of the intern and Montrose Extension knowing what I am capable of completing, I was given more opportunities to attend different activities and complete more projects.

Coordinating the TRA Livestock Field Day, helping with the TRA Cloverbud Camp, and redesigning the swine holding pens for the Delta County Fair were opportunities to learn as an intern, grow as a professional, and pay it forward to the 4-H program that I grew up in.

What I learned most this summer was how important building relationships are in the workplace and how to professionally manage issues.

“We may be enemies at work, but after 5 p.m. we are friends.”

Once county fairs started in July, free time became sparse and Wordless Wednesday didn’t happen but I made memories that would not have happened if I didn’t choose to return as the Montrose County 4-H intern.

The following are photos start from mid-July to now that capture the life of a 4-H intern living in western Colorado.